Perspectives on bushfires in Australia

ANALYSE - Natuurrampen zijn big business in Australië. Paul Frijters biedt een aantal economische perspectieven.

I remember the great bushfire in Canberra of 2003. I had only arrived with the family a week before and had just rented a nice house near the top of Mt Cook, right in the path of an enormous bushfire that ended up destroying hundreds of homes.

The heat of that day was immense: 40 degrees and strong winds. Activity was similarly frantic. Warnings on the radio of how the seemingly impossible was truly happening: fires that broke all containment lines were converging on the capital. Barbecues got cancelled as everyone returned home to prepare: people feverishly cleaning out the gutters of their house to remove anything that would easily combust; people filling up their bathtubs to be able to quickly immerse themselves if needed; the ban on using hose-pipes suddenly being lifted as the importance of water conservation gave way to survival. Our neighbour, whom we never talked to before, or afterwards, was suddenly very chummy in the face of this imminent joint danger. Indeed, there was a palpable buzz about Canberra as people went through a shared emergency.

I remember standing on top of Mt Cook, seeing the fires break more containment lines on their way to our neighbourhood. In the distance, we could see huge fire-arcs of hundreds of meters, via which whole trees, full of igniting oils, were whirled into the Southern suburbs, causing immense damage to people and property. One had to be in awe of that kind of destructive force, which simply seemed too great for humans to meaningfully oppose. One suddenly felt a bit silly, holding two hosepipes in one’s hand waiting for these huge fires to come! Luckily for my neighbourhood, the wind shifted just as the fires were about to hit us, with the cooler air streaming from the opposite direction effectively ending the tragedy. For months afterwards, family back in the Netherlands and the UK would ask whether there were any houses left in Canberra and whether we had been lucky. We had been.

Yesterday and today, there are more large bushfires running wild in Australia and fears of a repeat of the 2003 fires abound. Let us hope things don’t get that bad.

Putting on my social scientist hat, I can offer the following perspectives on these bushfires:

  1. I am no expert in these things, but am told such fires are often the result of heavy rains in previous years, which meant a lot more plant-growth which is currently fuelling the flames. Perhaps a lack of back-burning in previous years might also be involved. This is where economics come in: the choice to do only limited back-burning is of course a political choice that involves a trade-off between the wish to have a more natural landscape and the wish to have a less fire-prone and thereby less natural landscape. The choice of allowing lots of houses in the middle of very forested areas is also a political one.
  2. At a stroke, Australia is emitting huge amounts of CO2. Apparently, the 2003 Canberra bushfires released some 190 million tonnes, roughly half of what the economy goes through in a year. So forget about meeting our Kyoto targets this year. At least, if counting properly…
  3. They are great fraternising events. Fire-fighters are brought in from all over the country to these things, and the whole nation is gelled together as everyone has something at stake. Not only will communities share their fire-fighters, but bushfires are a real worry around the country, making everyone realise that ‘this could have been them’. There is also a kind of heroism about fighting these natural phenomena, and emergency services get a real work-out during such events, which keeps them efficient and scrutinised. Together with cyclones, floods, and droughts, bushfires are some of the most effective means of nation-hood building Australia has. This in turn means these fires are great for future tax compliance and community cohesion in general. During bushfires, new immigrants become citizens as they share in the drama and the risks with those who have been there longer. Age, skin colour, and religion cease to matter as the fires don’t care about such things. Whilst a tragedy for the victims, these emergencies have great propaganda value for the nation state.
  4. Natural disasters are big business in Australia. Natural disasters in the period before 1999 have been estimated to cost around 1.14 billion per year in 1999 money. Floods in particular were found to be very expensive, costing up to 1% of total GDP for a bad flood. These estimates seem to include only direct costs though via property and health effects. Indirect costs, such as when mayor floods spawn large public programs to capture flash floods in large dams, are not included, nor do the direct costs of maintaining all the emergency services seem to be included. Adding all that and realising that we had quite a few major disasters in the last 10 years (major cyclones, a major flood, a major drought, and 3 large fires) one would probably be looking at something like a 0.5-1% cost in terms of GDP per year in the last 10 years. That is a lot of business, because of course the main economic costs are in re-construction of damaged property. It is also big business for insurers.
  5. Invariably, bushfires raise controversies about insurers’ definitions of fire damage. It will not be new to Australians, but people living in less fire-prone areas might be amazed to know how tight one can make that definition. Damage due to fire smoke, and smouldering embers is for instance not the same as damage due to fire. One’s whole house can hence be blackened by smoke and crumpled by embers, but it is not necessarily fire damage and hence not necessarily covered by mere fire insurance. You get similar issues surrounding floods, with damage due to mould and moisture not being the same as pure flood damage. The wondrous ability to twist language so as to avoid paying out reasonable claims is on full display after such events.
  6. The economics of insurance-payouts surrounding natural disasters is interesting, as large private insurers essentially have much deeper pockets than their customers and so in principle could get away with paying almost nothing, simply forcing private individuals to go through endless costly legal procedures that cost more than the damages they would eventually recoup. Via such threats, insurance companies could normally manage to pay out almost nothing, whatever the actual merits of a claim. It is the wish to attract new business and to avoid the wrath of the governments, whose pockets and powers are large enough to take them on, that forms the actual reason to pay out any damages, meaning that insurance companies will be playing a waiting game oriented towards minimizing the negative media impact whilst paying out as little as possible. By waiting to pay out, insurance companies can hope that the media interest dies down as there are new disasters to cover and as claimants simply die of old age before being paid. In turn, this means that an ability to reach the media is key for a community to be able to force insurance payouts of natural disasters, raising the issue of optimal institutions that monitor insurance behaviour.
  7. You get the inevitable quasi-religious stories linking disasters to ‘sin’, essentially via a simple morality-play argument of ‘you have sinned, so now you are punished’. You had fruitcakes blaming the 2009 bushfires on Australia’s abortion laws. The first off the block this time round was Christina Figueres, a UN climate change marketer, wagging her finger at Australia, telling CNN reporters there was ‘absolutely’ a link between climate change and wildfires.
  1. 1

    Goed verhaal.

    the choice to do only limited back-burning is of course a political choice that involves a trade-off between the wish to have a more natural landscape and the wish to have a less fire-prone and thereby less natural landscape.

    In Australië is het strafbaar om de natuurlijke vegetatie te verwijderen of gecontroleerd te verbranden.

    The choice of allowing lots of houses in the middle of very forested areas is also a political one.

    Maar er worden wel huizen gebouwd in brandgevaarlijke natuurgebieden.

    7. You get the inevitable quasi-religious stories linking disasters to ‘sin’, essentially via a simple morality-play argument of ‘you have sinned, so now you are punished’.

    De belangrijkste zonde zou natuurlijk onze CO2-uitstoot zijn waardoor de temperatuur hoger wordt en de bosbranden vaker zullen voorkomen.
    Een direct causaal verband tussen bosbranden en de mondiale temperatuur is helaas niet aan te tonen. Het blijft [b]quasi-religieus[/q].

  2. 2

    @Hans, de kersenplukker:

    In Australië is het strafbaar om de natuurlijke vegetatie te verwijderen of gecontroleerd te verbranden.

    Behalve als je er een vergunning voor vraagt.
    http://www.dse.vic.gov.au/land-management/land/native-vegetation-home/native-vegetation-permit-applicants

    Maar er worden wel huizen gebouwd in brandgevaarlijke natuurgebieden.

    Maar niet zomaar en lukraak.
    http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/dsp_content.cfm?cat_id=1009

    En zo zou je eigenlijk alles dat Hans Verbeek zegt even na moeten trekken.

  3. 4

    @3: wat je zegt is waar, maar je zou dan bosbranden wereldwijd en altijd dan moeten zien te voorkomen. Gaat je niet lukken, vrees ik. En voordat iemand anders er mee komt (de auteur van het artikel impliceert dit al een beetje), CO2 uitstoot als gevolg van bosbranden is van alle tijden en onderdeel van de koolstofcyclus. Onze verbranding van fossiele brandstoffen is dat niet en is dus wat de balans doet omslaan, ondanks dat de natuur waanzinnig z’n best doet om het wel vast te houden in andere plekken dan de atmosfeer.

    PS Jo Nova links doen afbreuk aan je geloofwaardigheid, Herman.

  4. 5

    @2: majava, heb je ook cijfers over het toekennen van vergunningen om vegetatie weg te branden?
    Kennelijk werkt het vergunningensysteem niet goed, want bijna elk jaar zijn er weer enorme bosbranden.

    Je hebt een punt: het bouwen in een brandbaar bosgebied wordt gereguleerd (sinds 2006 !!).
    Maar ook die regulering lijkt niet te werken, want bijna elk jaar zien we weer huizen in vlammen opgaan.

    Ik juich het toe als mensen natrekken wat ik beweer. Ik heb de waarheid niet in pacht en wil graag weten wanneer ik de plank mis sla. #voortschrijdendinzicht

  5. 6

    @4: Bosbranden veroorzaken naar schatting 25% van jaarlijkse CO2 uitstoot. Even in schril contrast met bijvoorbeeld de 3% van vliegverkeer. Bosbrand-preventie en bosbeheer kan een hoop CO2 uitstoot voorkomen. Bomen die niet afbranden nemen CO2 op. Door vergroening zonder beheer (Fuel load) neemt de kans op brand toe zoals in Australie. Door bosbrand gaat ook nog eens een enorme hoeveelheid biomassa verloren.

    Ik stel dit niet in de plaats van fossiele reductie, maar waarom wil je deze kansen laten liggen? Waarom geen wereldwijde aanpak van Bosbrand-preventie? Waarom moeten bosbrandlanden dit zelf oplossen?

  6. 7

    @6: misschien omdat dit heel slecht mogelijk is? Zoals je misschien hebt gemerkt heb ik niet gereageerd op wat de auteur en ook Verbeek ter discussie stellen, over het linken van klimaatverandering met bosbranden. Dat is namelijk heel moeilijk.

    Veel bosbranden ontstaan door natuurlijke processen. Het is onmogelijk om dat te voorkomen. Net zoals je de mens niet uit de natuur kunt weren.

  7. 8

    @7: Wat hebben we nodig voor brand: 1. Brandstof 2. Ontsteking 3. Zuurstof. Zelf ken ik maar 1 ontsteking die natuurlijk genoemd kan worden: blikseminslag. Welke kennen we nog meer dan? Het grootste deel van de bosbranden wordt door de mens veroorzaakt. Overigens, wat doet het er toe of het natuurlijk is of niet? Wij hebben de mogelijkheid om dat te reguleren. Zie het maar als een vorm van GEO engineering.

    En is dat slecht mogelijk? Wat is dat nu voor flauwekul. Het is slechts een kwestie van geld en willen. Overigens maak ik denk ik in het vergelijk met CO2 uitstoot van luchtvaart nog een foutje denk ik: vliegen is 3% van Antropogeen. Antropogene uitstoot is een klein deel van het totaal.

    Bosbrand-preventie heeft een enorm effect op CO2 uitstoot:
    1. Directe CO2 reductie
    2. Bos blijft behouden Als CO2 opnemer
    3. Bos blijft behouden voor biomassa
    4. Biomassa verminderd fossiele verbranding

  8. 9

    The four major natural causes of wildfire ignitions are lightning, volcanic eruption, sparks from rockfalls, and spontaneous combustion

    en

    The most common cause of wildfires varies throughout the world. In the Canada and northwest China, for example, lightning is the major source of ignition. In other parts of the world, human involvement is a major contributor.

    Dat is waarom ik schreef wat ik schreef.

  9. 10

    @8: “Bosbrand-preventie heeft enorm effect op CO2 uitstoot:”
    1. Directe CO2 reductie
    – ook een bosbrand hoort tot de “korte” CO2 kringloop
    2. Bos blijft behouden Als CO2 opnemer
    – een oud bos neemt (veel) minder CO2 op dan een nieuw bos, zoals dat opgroeit na een bosbrand
    3. Bos blijft behouden voor biomassa+biomassa verminderd fossiele verbranding

    – Dat zou zo zijn als het energieverbruik niet groeit en dus zon-pv, windenergie, biomassa … fossiel vervangt en niet aanvult.
    (nog afgezien van de energie voor kap, transport, herplant e.d)
    Voor verschillende vormen van bijstook, vooral bij biobrandstof wordt de netto CO2 winst betwijfeld. Zuiniger auto’s geven (veel) meer CO2 winst dan de huidige biobrandstof bijmenging.

  10. 11

    @4: “CO2 uitstoot als gevolg van bosbranden is van alle tijden en onderdeel van de koolstofcyclus. Onze verbranding van fossiele brandstoffen is dat niet en is dus wat de balans doet omslaan”

    De spijker op de kop. Al dat groen is een tijdelijk opslag van CO2, vergeleken met de langdurig opslag van CO2 in fossiele vorm.

    Toch raar dat alleen Majava dat schijnt te begrijpen..

  11. 12

    @9: Zoals je al schrijft: ” In other parts of the world, human involvement is a major contributor.” En dan kan je wel “The four major natural causes of wildfire” opnoemen maar de waarheid is dat als natuurlijke oorzaak lightning de grootste is en verder alles voornamelijk human oorzaak kent.

    Waar wil je heen? Ontkennen dat bosbranden een grote jaarlijkse veroorzaker is van CO2 uitstoot? Niet willen inzien dat wij mensen, hetzij door preventie dan wel door bestrijding brand onder controle kunnen hebben en het alleen van inzet(geld) afhangt hoeveel er afbrand per jaar?

  12. 13

    @10: Waar het vooral om gaat dat bosbranden een enorm aandeel in de totale CO2 uitstoot heeft. Voor de rest is opslag in groen tijdelijk, dat klopt.

    Hout is brandstof, en het verstoken van hout vermindert de stook van fossiel. Iedereen snapt dat als wij bomen kappen, transporteren in grote schepen en over de halve wereld sturen om vervolgens in centrales om te zetten in elektriciteit, dat we niet zo slim bezig zijn. Heel anders wordt het als lokale biomassa direct (eventueel via houtpallets) wordt gebruikt voor verwarming. Nog beter is het om hout om te zetten in gebruiksartikelen ter vervanging van staal, indien mogelijk.

    Maar met die details dwalen we af waar het om gaat:

    1. Bosbranden hebben een groot aandeel in de CO2 uitstoot
    2. Wij zijn in staat deze uitstoot sterk te reguleren.

    En de vraag: waarom doen wij dat niet?

  13. 14

    @13: De vraag is waarom Herman Vruggink niet wil inzien dat bosbranden van alle tijden zijn en onderdeel van de koolstofcyclus uitmaken. En dat dit niet geldt voor onze verbranding van fossiele brandstoffen (@4).

    Als mensen gewoon over argumenten heen lopen is er maar 1 middel: gewoon dooremmeren.

  14. 15

    @13: “opslag in groen tijdelijk” gevolgt door uitstoot van tijdelijk ongeslagen CO2 zoals bij bosbranden.
    Dat we hout beter kunnen gebruiken en daarmee de uitstoot uitstellen maak dat niet anders.

    – @:=”het verstoken van hout vermindert de stook van fossiel”
    Als dat al zo is, is die vermindering marginaal. Bijstook van biomassa, biobrandstof is eerder aanvullend dan vervangend.
    Alleen de armsten, waarvoor fossiel onbetaalbaar is, zijn aangewezen op sprokkelhout met alle gevolgen voor de eigen gezondheid en hun milieu.

    – @: “Wij zijn in staat deze uitstoot sterk te reguleren”
    Ja door energiebesparing!

  15. 16

    @15:

    1. Bosbranden hebben een groot aandeel in de CO2 uitstoot
    2. Wij zijn in staat deze uitstoot sterk te reguleren.
    En de vraag: waarom doen wij dat niet?

    Hoe groot is dat aandeel? heel erg groot, zie punt 2 van het blog.
    Kunnen wij hier wat aan doen? JA absoluut, in sterke mate.

    Het komt mij nu voor dat je dit vraagstuk ontwijkt. Waarom?

  16. 18

    @14: Bosbranden zijn van alle tijden. Ja dus? Het klinkt als een ontkenner die brult dat klimaatverandering van alle tijden is. Ben jij nu zo dom of ben ik nu zo slim, of kom jij nu weer eens de trol uithangen mister Handycap?

    Wil jij soms ontkennen dat bosbranden een groot aandeel hebben in CO2 uitstoot? Wil jij soms ontkennen dat wij daar aan wat kunnen doen? Wat nou, bosbranden maken onderdeel uit van de koolstofcyclus. Verbranding is verbranding, en bij elke verbranding komt CO2 vrij. Waar gaat het jouw eigenlijk om?

  17. 19

    @18: O, je begrijpt niet dat er een verschil bestaat met de verbranding van fossiele brandstoffen?

    ” Ben jij nu zo dom of ben ik nu zo slim, of kom jij nu weer eens de trol uithangen mister Handycap?”

    Het gaat weer eens om een mogelijkheid die je over hoofd ziet:
    Jij bent zo dom.

  18. 21

    Het is altijd fijn dat er een trolletje rondhangt die je smeekt om het nog eens uit te leggen. Niet dat hij het zelf zal willen begrijpen, maar wellicht heeft een verdwaalde passant er nog iets aan. Welnu:

    Een aantal eeuwen geleden was er min of meer sprake van balans in de koolstofcyclus. De natuurlijke CO2-emissie door rotting en bosbranden was ongeveer even groot als de natuurlijke CO2-opslag door groen en oceaan. Bosbranden werden voor een groot deel door natuurlijke oorzaak veroorzaakt. In tijdsbestek van minder dan honderd jaar is dat drastisch veranderd. De ontbossing was de laatste 100 jaar draconisch, landgebruik veranderde onder druk van de bevolkingsexplosie totaal. Tegenwoordig wordt 95% van de bosbranden veroorzaakt door de mens, moedwillig dan wel door slordigheid. Ieder jaar verdwijnt wereldwijd ongeveer tien miljoen hectare bos door bosbranden. Afgezien van het verlies aan natuur hebben bosbranden ook grote gevolgen voor het klimaat. Door de vernietiging van de bomen komt heel veel CO2 vrij die bijdraagt aan de opwarming. Deze door mens veroorzaakte bosbranden zorgen voor 30% – 50% van de CO2 uitstoot. In kurkdroge jaren gaat in Australië de uitstoot door bosbrand de industriële emissie ver te boven.

    Nu zou je kunnen denken dat door massale aanplant we in principe de balans moeten kunnen herstellen, maar er is nog een bijkomende reden om eens serieus te gaan kijken naar CO2 reductie door bosbrand-preventie. Wij wensen namelijk dat de opwarming onder de twee graden moet blijven. Elke mogelijkheid om op korte termijn CO2 te reduceren is dan meegenomen. Indien je binnen 10 jaar wereldwijd 20% kan reduceren dan doe je natuurlijk hele goede zaken. Daarnaast is het zo dat hout een uitstekende brandstof is als alternatief voor fossiele brandstof en nog veel beter, ook een grondstof als alternatief van bijvoorbeeld staal. Wat is nu eigenlijk de reden dat er relatief weinig aandacht is voor deze mogelijkheid? Het zou kunnen zijn dat bosbrand niet is meegenomen in klimaatverdragen. Dit is een punt wat gerust in 2015 mag veranderen.

    http://vorige.nrc.nl/buitenland/article2152325.ece/Bosbrand_is_slecht_voor_het_klimaat
    http://www.falw.vu.nl/nl/voor-het-vwo/wetenschap-in-gewone-woorden/Aardwetenschappen/klimaat/bosbranden-en-co2.asp
    http://www.volkskrant.nl/vk/nl/2664/Nieuws/article/detail/354264/2009/09/21/Uitstoot-CO2-Indonesie-veel-hoger-dan-gemeld.dhtml
    http://www.wnf.nl/nl/wat_wnf_doet/thema_s/bossen/ontbossing/bosbranden/

  19. 22

    @21: Mijn punten in @10 en @15 zal ik niet herhalen.
    Bosbranden kunnen bijdragen tot ontbossing, noodzakelijk is dat niet, ook kap kan voor ontbossing zorgen, massale aanplant herstelt de belans.

    @21: “hout een uitstekende alternatief voor fossiele”.
    Zoals al eerder gezegd, de praktijk is hout (biomassa) EN fossiel.

  20. 23

    @22: Natuurlijk is kap een andere reden van ontbossing, dat klopt. In vrijwel alle gevallen is de mens de oorzaak. Zie mijn referenties. En ja, zoals ik ook al aangaf, met massale aanplant herstel je de balans. Is dat wat je wilt zeggen? Laat maar branden, geeft niet, we planten het gewoon weer aan en anders doet de natuur het zelf wel?

    Bosbranden zorgen voor 30% – 50% van de CO2 uitstoot, en ook al zouden wij de balans steeds herstellen (wat we dus niet doen) dan gaan we voorbij aan de kans om op korte termijn CO2 te reduceren, wat wel eens noodzaak kan zijn als wij onder de twee graden willen blijven. En Nee, niet in plaats van maatregelen als energie besparing.

    Soms is het verstandig om je af te vragen wat we nu aan het sjouwen zijn met z’n allen. Dat is waar punt 2 van dit blog over gaat, en ook maakt de spotprent van Jo Nova dit duidelijk: http://jonova.s3.amazonaws.com/artwork/media/abc-how-to-prevent-bushfires-web.gif

    Met bloed zweet en tranen zorgen voor 1% reductie terwijl je de bossen laat afbranden die voor een verdubbeling van je emissie zorgen?

  21. 24

    Afrika telt vandaag 1000 millioen zielen, men verwacht dat het er over 27 jaren 2000 millioen zullen zijn.
    Wat er werkelijk moet gebeuren, lijkt nu wel duidelijk.